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(14 Nov 2012) 
1. Wide, pull out from Saqqara pyramid to the site of the newly discovered tombs
2. Tilt down of entrance of tomb
3. Various of drawings and hieroglyphic inscriptions on the walls of Princess Shert Nebti's tomb 
4. Various set up shots of Professor Miroslav Barta inside Shert Nebti's tomb 
5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Miroslav Barta, Head of the Czech archaeology team: 
"We are standing in the centre of this fascinating cemetery which is 45 centuries old. All the monuments around us developed during the 5th dynasty and belonged to several very powerful families. One of the leading persons that was buried here is the princess Shert Nebti. The excavation is not finished yet but still, what we have for the moment is this unique pillared cord which contain four pillars which were originally roofed and inscriptions that say that Shert Nebti, the nose of two ladies, belonged to a royal family, a royal family of the king that is buried northwards in the pyramid field of Abu Sir."
6. Wide of the complex of tombs showing the 4 pillars
7. Various of archaeologist cleaning hieroglyphic inscriptions on the lime stone columns outside the tomb
8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Miroslav Barta, Head of the Czech archaeology team: 
"Around us developed four more tombs. One of them belonged to Shert Nebti herself. The other three tombs belonged to high officials of the day including the official Nefer -a beautiful one- so the monument that we have been uncovering here over the past few weeks, the inscriptions, the historical information, archaeological monuments belong to the best discoveries over the past few years in the whole area."
9. Various of statues found inside Shert Nebti's tomb 
10. Various of archaeologists inspecting statues found in the tomb
11.Mid of statues 
STORYLINE: 
Czech archaeologists have unearthed the 4,500-year-old tomb of a Pharaonic princess south of Cairo, in a finding that suggests other undiscovered tombs may be in the area. 
Professor Miroslav Barta, who heads the Czech archaeologist team, said that Princess Shert Nebti's burial site is surrounded by the tombs of four high officials from the Fifth Dynasty dating to around 2,500 BC in the Abu Sir complex near the famed step pyramid of Saqqara.  
Inscriptions on the four limestone pillars of the Princess' tomb indicate that she is the daughter of King Men Salbo.
"One of the leading persons that was buried here is the princess Shert Nebti...Shert Nebti, the nose of two ladies, belonged to a royal family, a royal family of a king that is buried northwards in the pyramid field of Abu Sir," said Barta. 
The antechamber to the princess' tomb includes four limestone columns and hieroglyphic inscriptions. 
The current excavation has also unearthed an antechamber containing the sarcophagi of the four officials and statues of men, women, and a child. 
The archaeologists working at the site are from the Czech Institute of Egyptology, which is funded by the Charles University of Prague.
Their excavation began this month.
The discovery comes weeks after the Egyptian government reopened a pyramid and a complex of tombs that had been closed for restoration work for a decade.
Egypt's vital tourism industry has suffered from the country's internal unrest in the wake of the 2011 uprising that toppled autocratic leader Hosni Mubarak. 
A delegation from the International Monetary Fund is currently in Egypt for negotiations over a 4.8 (b) billion US dollar loan aimed at bolstering the country's ailing economy.



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